Mike Heid is president of Wells Fargo Home Mortgage (WFHM), a division of Wells Fargo Bank, N.A., and an executive vice president and member of the Operating Committee of Wells Fargo & Company.

Saturday’s surprise demonstration at the Urbandale residence of a prominent bank executive seemed to be as much about timing and location as content.

About 200 activists rode five school buses to the home of Michael Heid, the president of Wells Fargo Home Mortgage. They reiterated a familiar set of concerns they had about the corporation, although the protest was not a stand-alone event.

Equally important to organizers and participants were considerations, part tactical and part inspiration, based on what preceded and what will follow the demonstration, the capstone to a daylong training session.

There is residual energy from last year’s protests against wealth inequality and upcoming shareholder meetings for large banks later this month, which protesters plan to politely infiltrate.

The event in Des Moines was one of dozens happening across the country this week.

“We’ve got energy from Occupy, got a national conversation going, and the opportunity with shareholders. It’s a perfect set of conditions,” said Chris Neubert, an economic justice organizer for Iowa Citizens for Community Improvement, which organized Saturday’s activities. “Bring people together and put in the right amount of inspiration.”

Wells Fargo officials weren’t available for comment Saturday. Heid didn’t respond to a voice mail message left by the Register on his home telephone.

On the ride to and from Heid’s Urbandale home and in the street in front of his immaculately trimmed lawn, members of Iowa Citizens for Community Improvement, various labor unions and the local Occupy movement — all of which overlapped — railed against the ills they accused Wells Fargo of: funding corporate prisons, funding payday lenders, not paying a fair amount of corporate taxes, and refusing to take steps that would help underwater mortgage holders.

The exact destination had been a surprise to almost everyone on the buses, and leaders didn’t reveal where they were going until buses were halfway there. The element of surprise didn’t quite work, however. Neighbors said Heid left his house shortly before protesters arrived.

But they left a letter pasted to poster board — “so giant he’ll have to read it and absorb it” — on his porch before heeding police officers’ requests to leave. On their way out of the neighborhood they passed out fliers and talked to neighbors.

Larry Ginter, 72, a CCI member who farms in rural Iowa, led the “people’s shareholder meeting” in front of Heid’s house. The resolutions passed there were similar to ones he will take to Wells Fargo’s shareholder meeting on April 24.

Community organizers bought him shares in the bank, so he will sit in the meeting while others protest outside.

“There are a lot of people hurting out there,” Ginter said, listing again the litany of concerns. “But now we’re putting our foot down. We won’t go away. We are here to stay.”

Gil Dawes, 78, said he had been to other protests with CCI, although never at someone’s house. But he said it sent the right signal, that executives can’t hide from people.

“Too bad he wasn’t courageous enough to face people, some of whom are probably his borrowers,” said Barbara Kalbach, 61, a fourth-generation farmer. “We’re not threatening. Why did he have to run away?”

Saturday’s surprise demonstration at the Urbandale residence of a prominent bank executive seemed to be as much about timing and location as content.

About 200 activists rode five school buses to the home of Michael Heid, the president of Wells Fargo Home Mortgage. They reiterated a familiar set of concerns they had about the corporation, although the protest was not a stand-alone event.

Equally important to organizers and participants were considerations, part tactical and part inspiration, based on what preceded and what will follow the demonstration, the capstone to a daylong training session.

There is residual energy from last year’s protests against wealth inequality and upcoming shareholder meetings for large banks later this month, which protesters plan to politely infiltrate. And the event in Des Moines was just one of dozens happening across the country this week.

“We’ve got energy from Occupy, got a national conversation going, and the opportunity with shareholders. It’s a perfect set of conditions,” said Chris Neubert, an economic justice organizer for Iowa Citizens for Community Improvement, which organized Saturday’s activities. “Bring people together and put in the right amount of inspiration.”

Wells Fargo officials weren’t available for comment on Saturday. Heid didn’t immediately respond to a voicemail message left by the Des Moines Register on his home telephone.

On the ride to and from Heid’s Urbandale home and in the street in front of his immaculately trimmed lawn, members of Iowa Citizens for Community Improvement, various labor unions and the local Occupy movement — all of which overlapped — railed against the ills they accused Wells Fargo of: funding corporate prisons, funding payday lenders, not paying a fair amount of corporate taxes and refusing to take steps that would help underwater mortgage holders.

The exact destination had been a surprise to almost everyone on the buses and leaders didn’t reveal where they were going until buses were halfway there. The element of surprise didn’t quite work, however. Neighbors said Heid left his house shortly before protesters arrived.

But they left a letter pasted to poster board — “so giant he’ll have to read it and absorb it” — on his porch before heeding police officers’ requests to leave. On their way out of the neighborhood they passed out fliers and talked to neighbors.

Larry Ginter, 72, a CCI member who farms in rural Iowa, led the “people’s shareholder meeting” in front of Heid’s house. The resolutions passed there were similar to ones he will take to Wells Fargo’s shareholder meeting on April 24.

Community organizers bought him shares in the bank, so he and others like him from across the country, will sit in the meeting while others protest outside.

“There are a lot of people hurting out there,” Ginter said, listing again the litany of concerns. “But now we’re putting our foot down. We won’t go away. We are here to stay.”

For others, the protest sent a powerful message about Wells Fargo executives.

Gil Dawes, 78, said he had been to other protests with CCI, although never at someone’s house. But he said it sent the right signal, that executives can’t hide from people.

“Too bad he wasn’t courageous enough to face people, some of whom are probably his borrowers,” said Barbara Kalbach, 61, a fourth-generation farmer. “We’re not threatening. Why did he have to run away?”

From Wells Fargo website:

Mike Heid is president of Wells Fargo Home Mortgage (WFHM), a division of Wells Fargo Bank, N.A., and an executive vice president and member of the Operating Committee of Wells Fargo & Company. WFHM is the nation’s leading provider of residential mortgages, funding one of every four residential mortgages in the country and servicing one of every six mortgage loans in the U.S. including loans Wells Fargo holds, as well as loans held by other mortgage investors.

Heid is responsible for WFHM’s overall business and strategic direction. A 26-year veteran of the mortgage business, he most recently served as co-president of WFHM from June 2004 to July 2011. Previously within the mortgage division, Heid was executive vice president and chief financial officer (2002 to 2004) and executive vice president, Loan Servicing (1997 to 2002). Heid joined Wells Fargo in 1988. His prior experience includes working at Price Waterhouse for six years as a public accountant.

From May 2008 through May 2011 – a time of significant industry transformation – Heid served as chairman of the Housing Policy Council of the Financial Services Roundtable, a trade association whose members represent approximately 65 percent of the mortgage industry. He also has served as chairman of the Fannie Mae National Housing Advisory Council. He continues to be actively involved in legislative and regulatory policy matters impacting the mortgage industry.

Heid earned a bachelor’s degree in accounting from the University of Wisconsin – Whitewater in 1979 where he graduated summa cum laude. He is a Certified Public Accountant and a member of the Mortgage Bankers Association.

Why is the US Department of Defense so interested in this post? They visit every other day as if they work for Wells Fargo???

  • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=100001464695070 Renee Knafel-Bullock

    I yell at them almost every day there in des moines, i am calling from alaska i wish i could of been there, i am still wainting to find out where all of my family missing payments were applied, they told the protection agency and myself they need more time thank goodness i saved 16 years worth of payments, ha you could of heard a pin drop when i told them that, imagine the interest on top of about 25000. in payments unapplied over a course of 6 years, since 1994, wow thats a good chunk of money, no wonder there was defaulting, if the payment is missappropriated to someones elses account which i have proof of that too, then yeah, id say theres a default, and its in the piss poor management and mortgage servicing abuse beatings, dont worry wells I’m getting my ducks in a line, and I need a loan, hahaha wheres my money, ya found it yet?

  • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=100001464695070 Renee Knafel-Bullock

    thanks to whoever got this one, thats some funny shit hahahahaha

  • Saladtosser

    Wow what a complete goon,geek,dweeb,freak that guy looks like and what an impressive education[NOT] he must kiss some big white tookass on a very regular basis.

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